Why We GSC: Featuring Sarah H.

Meet Sarah H., the GSC’s Curator of Aquatics. Her job is to help develop a vision for the department and ensure that the Aquatics team has the tools and knowledge they need to accomplish their jobs.

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Sarah’s story is an especially interesting one. She worked here for a short while about six years ago, then left for five years – but ultimately decided to come back. When we asked her what drew her to return, she had this to say:

I’ve been very fortunate to work at three different facilities and even luckier to find a place I can call home.

After six years in the aquarium field, I was looking for a challenge. The idea of helping the Greensboro Science Center bring a bit of the ocean to a landlocked city seemed like the perfect opportunity.

Shortly after helping to open the GSC’s aquarium back in 2013, I was offered a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to work at a world-renowned facility – an opportunity that, had I turned it down, I would have wondered about it the rest of my life. So I made the difficult decision to leave the GSC to reach for a dream.

However, I found I missed those intangibles that made the GSC feel less like work and more like home. After five years away, I made a much easier decision to come back to the opportunities that awaited me here.

I am proud to be a member of the Greensboro Science Center family and am excited to create a new dream with Greensboro’s only public aquarium.

Living the Mission: GSC Staff Awarded Conservation & Research Grants

This year, the Greensboro Science Center provided staff a brand new opportunity to apply for what is known as the Conservation and Research Grant. This annual grant offers GSC staff the opportunity to pursue a conservation or research project. Eligible proposals can range from pursing a professional development opportunity, facilitating an existing field project (like mussel surveys or bat acoustic work), creating a conservation project (like a stream clean-up or butterfly garden), or taking on a new research question. After undergoing an extensive assessment by our staff Research Committee, this year’s recipients have been announced.

Shannon Anderson, Zoo Keeper: SANCCOB’s Keeper Exchange Program

Penguin DivingShannon will travel to South Africa to work with SANCCOB staff to refine her skills in bird care and chick rearing; Shannon’s knowledge and passion for penguins led her to pursue this program. On this trip, she’ll have the opportunity to work with field biologists, conservationists and sea bird specialists to expand her knowledge and will share her experience with staff at a presentation following her time in South Africa.

Rachel Rogers, Aquarist: Mote Marine Coral Restoration Workshop

coral 02Rachel, the GSC’s coral aquarist, has a passion for propagating and conserving coral species. At the workshop, she’ll learn the micro-fragmenting techniques used to propagate staghorn and elkhorn corals. She will also visit coral nurseries in the Florida Keys to gain knowledge on the best methods for growing and reproducing coral. She, too, will share her experience with staff at a presentation following the workshop.

Sam Beasley, Vet Tech: Sea Turtle Care Center at the South Carolina Aquarium

Sam Beasly | 36 | EditSam works alongside veterinarian Dr. Sam Young to care for the animals in our collection. Sam has a lifelong passion for turtles and rehabilitation of sea turtles. She will work with the vets and technicians at the Sea Turtle Care Center to rehabilitate sea turtles and care for injured turtles. There, she will learn new skills and receive hands-on training that will benefit her vet career. Sam will also be sharing with staff her experience when she returns.

We’re thrilled to have a team of staff who supports our mission of conservation by putting the “hands” in “hands-on.” Return to our blog in the near future for updates on the good works these team members will be doing!

Volunteer Spotlight: Evan E.

At the Greensboro Science Center, we are honored to welcome approximately 750 volunteers each year, giving a cumulative 36,000+ hours of their time. With a friendly greeting and a warm smile, our volunteers help us carry out our mission each day, educating our visitors about our animals and exhibits and inspiring them to learn more.

Meet Evan E. Evan has been volunteering with us for about three years now:

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I started volunteering at the Greensboro Science Center in 2013 as a junior curator, and transitioned into the Docent Program the next year. During my first year as a docent, I worked in the Aquarium, Zoo, and Herp Lab until I decided to primarily stay with the Zoo as my main location.

I was introduced to the volunteer program by a neighbor, and my passion for animal life motivated me to join. I have been coming to GSC my whole life, and it is a thrill to be a part of the community that continues to educate more of the public as it grows.

A specific memory I have from the science center is from the herp lab. A little girl walked in with her family, and she wanted to pet the cornsnake, Cornflake. After I let her pet Cornflake, she proceeded to ask if she could take all of the animals back to her home as pets. I laughed and told her that she could go to a pet shop if she wanted to get some animals. Moments with the public like this make volunteering a rewarding experience, and I look forward to many more memories in the future.

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Michaela T.

At the Greensboro Science Center, we are honored to welcome approximately 750 volunteers each year, giving a cumulative 36,000+ hours of their time. With a friendly greeting and a warm smile, our volunteers help us carry out our mission each day, educating our visitors about our animals and exhibits and inspiring them to learn more.

Meet Michaela T. Michaela says volunteering at the GSC combines the things she loves most – talking to people and being around animals!

Michaela T.

I have been a volunteer at the Science Center since the summer of 2015. I started out as an Animal Ambassador and loved it, so I then became a Zoo Docent in the fall of 2015. Ever since I was a kid, I was in love with the Science Center. I remember coming with my school group and crowding around the old Touch Tank with my other classmates and visiting the Herp Lab to look at the snakes, turtles and lizards.  I thought it would be the best to volunteer here and was so thrilled when I was accepted last spring.  This has been a great experience since I hope to one day work as a zookeeper. It also allows me to be around all the animals that my mom won’t let me keep at home!

My favorite stations in the Zoo rotation are the Discovery House and the Herp Lab.  I love to tell visitors about our incredible animals and to show them how special they are.  Most people that are fearful of animals like snakes are excited to have the opportunity to touch a snake and see how gentle they really are.

Volunteering at the Science Center combines the things that I love the most—talking to people, especially children, and being around animals.  Once, when I was working at Friendly Farm, a woman in a wheelchair came up with her husband and sat looking into the farm. I remember the huge smile she wore after I asked if she wanted to come inside.  I helped her through the gate and she sat in her chair and laughed as the goats and the children played around her.  I was just so happy she could enjoy the farm with everyone else.

Volunteer Spotlight: Bill L.

At the Greensboro Science Center, we are honored to welcome approximately 750 volunteers each year, giving a cumulative 36,000+ hours of their time. With a friendly greeting and a warm smile, our volunteers help us carry out our mission each day, educating our visitors about our animals and exhibits and inspiring them to learn more.

This week, we’d like to introduce you to Bill L:

Bill L.

I have been volunteering at the Greensboro Science Center for 1.5 years.  I typically volunteer on weekends, special events and whenever the Volunteer Department sends out an SOS call.  When I retire, I plan on spending more time at the Science Center.  I currently volunteer as a Docent in the aquarium.

I have worked with animals most of my life and it has brought me great joy, especially turtles and birds.  I also enjoy public speaking.  Working in the aquarium has allowed me to do both at the same time.

I have three goals each time I volunteer:  To engage, to enlighten, and to entertain.  I want our guests to enjoy their experience and to walk away with a new appreciation of animals.  I believe that increasing people’s interest in animals is the key to successful animal conservation.

At the end of a shift, I go home tired and happy!

Catch ‘Em All at PokeMonday Event on August 1!

In recent weeks, we’ve noticed a disturbing increase of usual activity on our grounds. It appears that the Greensboro Science Center is home to nine PokeStops and one gym, which has been attracting the attention of all kinds of Pokemon. These pesky Pokemon have been disrupting our staff, annoying our animals, and causing quite the commotion with our visitors.

Now, we understand that Pokemon are a natural part of our world and we certainly don’t mind welcoming the well-behaved ones. For example, Pidgeotto has tested our forward flight simulator and Staryu has been adding to the scenery in SciPlay. We are perfectly accepting of these polite Pokemon.

Pokemon Go - Pidgeotto and Staryu

However, we’ve seen a lot of inappropriate behavior that we feel must be stopped immediately. Meowth was spotted meddling with power tools during the construction of our new Destination: Dinosaur! exhibit. Pinsir has been perturbing our pandas, Beedrill has been buzzing around our gibbons, and Gloom has been drooling all over our floors!

Pokemon Go - Meowth Pincer Beedrill Gloom

We’ve decided that our best course of action is to request the help of Pokemon GO fans to help us catch ‘em all. On Monday, August 1 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., we’ll be hosting a special #PokeMonday event, during which time we will be placing lures at many of our PokeStops. We invite you to join us, place some lures of your own, and help us catch these vexatious virtual vermin so we can regain control of the GSC.

(Also, please challenge our gym. Some of our staff have been battling for bragging rights. We would greatly appreciate it if you would take over so they’ll get back to work…)

Volunteer Spotlight: Maddy F.

At the Greensboro Science Center, we are honored to welcome approximately 750 volunteers each year, giving a cumulative 36,000+ hours of their time. With a friendly greeting and a warm smile, our volunteers help us carry out our mission each day, educating our visitors about our animals and exhibits and inspiring them to learn more.

This week, we’d like to introduce you to Maddy F.

Maddy F.

I have been volunteering as a Zoo Docent since October 2014 and I try to volunteer 3-4 times a month.  When I was younger I would visit the Science Center frequently and always wanted to be a volunteer at some point in my life.  I started service learning in high school and thought that it would be a great opportunity to get involved at the Science Center since it has a great environment and I have made so many wonderful memories.

A meaningful memory that I have as a volunteer is when I was in the Discovery House and I had Floyd, the ferret, napping on my arm. A man and a woman came in the door with their son who was in a wheel chair. I greeted them and I knelt down low enough where the boy could easily touch Floyd and he smiled a big smile. His mother looked me in the eyes and said thank you so much and I could tell how appreciative she was. I could tell that I had made her and her son’s day. I love to see visitors so happy to see the animals at the Science Center and I enjoy talking to them and educating them about the animals as well.