Conservation Creation: 180 Steps Around the World

Summer is right around the corner and it’s once again time to take a tour around the world – all from within our very own Jeansboro Junction (located in Friendly Farm)! On this tour, you will get the chance to learn about our farm animals and their natural histories, as well as earn a souvenir to take home with you.

While commercial farms tend to focus on a single crop or species of livestock, smaller family farms tend to have many different plants and animals, which is what you will see in our farmyard here at the Greensboro Science Center. When farmers are setting up their farms, they will often think about the relationships between their herds and their gardens. For example, horse manure is a great crop fertilizer and can be used to help grow vegetables for people as well as hay for livestock. Free-range chickens are great for keeping pests out of gardens while also providing eggs to sell or eat.

During the farm planning process, farmers need to be aware of the needs of both their animals and their gardens to ensure an efficient and healthy farm. For our activity this month, you will be planning and creating your own farm diorama! Below, you will see an example of a farm that we created, as well as how to make a horse for your farmyard.

What you will need:a box, craft supplies and a creative mind! Running short on craft supplies? Visit Reconsidered Goods to stock up on donated materials without breaking the bank!

Step 1: Figure out what kinds of animals you want on your farm and what they will need to live happy and healthy lives. To get started, remember that the three essential needs for any living creature are food, water and shelter. If you’re using the internet, search for animal care sheets (ex. Horse Care Sheet) to find out what each animal needs.

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Step 2: Make your cork horse! Start by breaking 3 toothpicks in half. Use the pointy ends to add legs and a neck to your horse. You will have half of a toothpick left over.

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Step 3: Attach a smaller cork to the neck area of the horse; this will become the head. Use glue to attach string for hair and googly eyes (if you would like) for the finishing details.

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Step 4: Create your diorama with the animals you want on your farm! For our farmyard, we decided we wanted to have a garden, free-range chickens with a chicken coop, a fenced-in pasture for sheep and horses, and a well to make providing water easier on our farmer. For an added challenge, try using only recyclable materials or materials from your yard!

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Casper, the Friendly Goat

Although he’s not yet on exhibit, we couldn’t resist introducing you to Casper the Friendly Goat this Halloween.

Casper

Casper, the friendly goat

Casper is an approximately 6 month old Nubian Goat adopted by the Greensboro Science Center earlier this week. Around 2 months ago, Casper was surrendered to the Guilford County Animal Shelter after being attacked by a dog. The shelter called Red Dog Farm, a local non-profit organization dedicated to the rehabilitation, fostering and adoption of animals of all sizes. The organization took Casper in and paired him with Dick Young, a foster parent, to recover from his injuries and prepare for adoption.

Casper

Casper

Dick took great care of Casper. When he first arrived at his foster home, he was injured, skinny and skittish. Dick worked with a veterinarian to treat his wounds, beef him up a bit, and help him become more sociable. Now, he seems to really enjoy being around people and should be a great addition to the Center’s Friendly Farm.

Jessica Hoffman, the Center’s Curator of Birds and Mammals, said she has been waiting quite some time for a Nubian Goat to adopt. A dairy goat known for its characteristic floppy ears, the Nubian goat is typically an affectionate animal who likes people.

Due to his young age, zookeepers are hopeful that Casper will have fun testing his skills on the agility challenges recently added to the petting zoo area by Johnson Controls. Casper is currently in quarantine, so be sure to stay tuned to our Facebook page for more information about when he’ll be joining the other goats in the Friendly Farm. You’ll be able to easily identify him… our Nigerian goats are all dark in color while Casper, as his name suggests, is white as a ghost!

Casper

Casper is white as a ghost!